Give Us a Tantrum

No, really, I don't have laryngitis.

  • 17th October
    2014
  • 17
  • 19th November
    2013
  • 19
  • 25th June
    2013
  • 25

thedailywhat:

Infographic of the Day: The Literal Meaning of Every State Name in the United States

Check out the latest “North American” edition of the Atlas of True Names, a unique world mapping project that aims to chart the origin and history of the names of thousands of cities, states and rivers. Illustrated by American cartographers Stephan Hormes and Silke Peust, the recently released maps of the United States and Canada reveal that some names of cities and states translate more beautifully than others, such as Texas (Land of Friends) and New Mexico (New Navel of the Moon) in comparison to, say, Chicago (“Stinky Onion”)

(via ihatemike)

  • 15th April
    2013
  • 15
  • 8th April
    2013
  • 08
If you want to kill yourself, kill what you don’t like. I had an old self that I killed. You can kill yourself too, but that doesn’t mean you got to stop living.
Vargus, Archie’s Final Project   (via ceedling)

(Source: niiiiiicolaaa, via paledoll)

  • 22nd March
    2013
  • 22
  • 18th March
    2013
  • 18

brandef:

dreammason:

iamlittlei:

Oh man, the E.E. Cummings one.

And the Whitman one.

Swooning a little over here. 

Poets are always taking the weather so personally.

C ummings obtained training with green peace thus one year of absolute reform as probation ends Hammond harangue

(Source: , via yeahwriters)

  • 11th October
    2012
  • 11
  • 22nd August
    2012
  • 22
  • 13th July
    2012
  • 13
  • 11th July
    2012
  • 11

theatlantic:

In Focus: Lovely Sky Monsters

Award-winning photographer Camille Seaman, best known for her earlier work depicting massive polar icebergs, recently turned her lens on another incredible natural phenomenon - storm clouds above the American Midwest. She partnered with experienced storm chasers and began to stalk a particular type of storm cloud - the supercell. On June 22, 2012, in western Nebraska, she encountered an enormous supercell and captured its many faces.

See more.

Nature is so terribly awesome.

(via cinders-and-snow)

  • 10th July
    2012
  • 10

ianbrooks:

Quotable Arts by Evan Robertson / Obvious State

High quality giclée prints available at etsy. Distilling literary quotes from a handful of the masters down to a single graphic representation, Evan captures the raw concept of the sentence and makes it damn purty to look at as well.

(via: fab)

  • 7th July
    2012
  • 07
  • 28th June
    2012
  • 28
thedailywhat:

Kickass Mom of the Day: Angie Stevens is a mother of three who has doodled a pic of her family every night since her 2-year-old son was born.
She spends roughly 20 minutes capturing the day’s moments – tantrums, pizza-making, haircuts — then posts them to her blog, Doodlemum, where she has amassed some 700 mini memories.
Luckily, Stevens was an illustration major and her stuff isn’t half bad. And good or not, her drawings have become the highlight of her family’s day. Awww.
[iwidk]

thedailywhat:

Kickass Mom of the Day: Angie Stevens is a mother of three who has doodled a pic of her family every night since her 2-year-old son was born.

She spends roughly 20 minutes capturing the day’s moments – tantrums, pizza-making, haircuts — then posts them to her blog, Doodlemum, where she has amassed some 700 mini memories.

Luckily, Stevens was an illustration major and her stuff isn’t half bad. And good or not, her drawings have become the highlight of her family’s day. Awww.

[iwidk]

(Source: thedailywhat)

  • 27th June
    2012
  • 27
- When you began writing in your adult life, it felt like coming home. Back then, it was less like work than happiness, a return to the sunlit playground. That innocent pleasure has faded with the need to earn a living but even now, on a good day, there is nothing quite like it.
- You are alone. When you started out, you might have gone on a creative writing course which peddled the myth of teamwork, consultation and “feedback”. You have discovered, as you grow as a writer, what nonsense that is. Yours is a private project. If anything, sailing your rackety little boat as part of a flotilla actually increases the chance of it sinking.
- You are unreliable, a spy in the house of those you love. You may believe that you do not use the real world, sometimes with unattractive ruthlessness, but you do. Sooner or later, the stuff that really matters to you will appear in some form in your writing.
- You have an interest in stationery that borders on the obsessive. You may have developed a similar fascination with the new technology, but you would probably be wise to guard against that.
- You write a book, and when it’s gone, it’s gone. It turned out not to be the perfect work you once envisaged but, for better or worse, it has reached its destination. If you are lucky enough to be asked to talk about it months later when it is published, you will see it from the outside, almost as if it has been written by a stranger. Your mind is on what you are writing now.
- You know that your best work is in front of you.
- You wake up one day and discover that the excitements and disappointments involved in being published have become little more than a sideshow which, if taken seriously, will drive you round the bend. Success and failure very often involve things over which you have no control: luck, fashion, timing, being published by a marketing genius (or moron).
- You find yourself, rather shamingly being rather sparing when you write letters. You are not being paid. It is not part of your work. Words are your capital.
- You may not be terribly good socially. Because much of your most intense experience takes place in your writing, you can have a semi-absent air about you which others may, with some justification, find irritating or rude. This personal dysfunction can mess up your marriage, your family, your life. Sometimes you worry that one day you will be alone with only your words for company.
It just keeps going. You should read the whole thing. Wise words by Terence Blacker (from his ENDPAPERS column in the Society of Authors Magazine, THE AUTHOR), for anyone who is, who loves, or wants to be an author. (via neil-gaiman)

(Source: terenceblacker.com, via neil-gaiman)